Novel Dengue Virus Detection Method That Couples DNAzyme And Gold Nanoparticle Approaches

Tech ID: 13-047

Inventors: Dr. James Carter and Dr. Malcolm Fraser 

Date Added: August 22, 2019

 

Overview

A colorimetric Dengue Virus detection method that couples the RNA-targeting of a DNAzyme with the salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles.

Technology Summary

Dengue Viruses (DENV) cause periodic epidemics of Dengue Fever with an average of 50-100 million infections per year. Early detection of the virus is critical for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance. Current detection methods are slow, unstable in field conditions, require specialized training, and lack portability.
University of Notre Dame researchers have developed a colorimetric DENV detection method that couples the RNA targeting ability of a DENV-specific DNAzyme (DDZ) with the salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP). The DDZ-AuNP detection system and subsequent analysis are cost-effective, simple to perform, and the components are highly stable at temperatures above 30°C enabling easy storage at room temperature. The AuNPs coupled to DDZs permit detection by UV/Vis spectroscopy. 
The DDZ-AuNP detection method distinguishes DENV from other closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses. The researchers engineered DENV serotype-specific DNAzymes enabling the method to detect and differentiate all four known DENV serotypes. 

Market Advantages 

  • Inexpensive ($0.80 per sample) compared to other methods ($2.00+ per sample)
  • DNAzymes increases specificity and versatility of detection permitting use for other viruses
  • Can be packaged as a pre-mixed reaction solution in Eppendorf tubes and performed without any specialized equipment or training

Technology Readiness Status

TRL 4 - Lab Validation

Intellectual Property

US Patent 10,287,578 (Dnazyme-nanoparticle Conjugates And Methods Of Use Thereof)

Publication

A Novel Dengue Virus Detection Method That Couples Dnazyme And Gold Nanopartical Approaches. doi: 10.1186/1743-422X-10-201.

Contact

Richard Cox

rcox4@nd.edu

574.631.5158