Method and Apparatus for AC Electrospray

Tech ID: 0255

Inventors: Dr. Hsueh-Chia Chang

Date Added: August 22, 2019

 

Overview

0255

A method and apparatus for an electrospray device that utilizes a high frequency alternating current to facilitate the generation of micron-sized drops.

Technology Summary 

Direct current (DC) electrospray techniques have become the standard for forming various aerosols with applications found in compound analysis and drug delivery. Alternating current (AC) electrospray techniques exhibit similar capabilities with signal-to-noise ratios better than that of DC electrospray techniques. 
Dr. Hsueh-Chia Chang has developed a method and apparatus for an electrospray device that utilizes a high frequency alternating current to facilitate the generation of micron-sized drops. This apparatus functions by applying a high frequency AC (above 10 kHz) electric field across one or more micro-needles and one or more conducting elements. AC electrosprays have the capacity to generate aerosol drops which can be used for respiratory drug delivery. This method can also be used as an innovative microencapsulation technique for the encapsulation of drugs, DNA, protein, osteogenic or dermatological growth factors, bacteria, viruses, immobilized enzyme receptors and fluorescent particles for controlled release drug delivery, tissue or bone engineering, and as biosensors for clinical or drug monitoring. Additionally, this technology has the potential to be used to synthesize biodegradable fibers for tissue engineering and surgical sutures that enhance blood coagulation.

Market Advantages 

  • Better signal-to-noise ratios than DC electrosprays
  • Many suitable liquids including dielectric liquids, electrolytes, methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, acetone or mixtures thereof
  • Many potential applications (respiratory drug delivery, microencapsulation, etc.)

Technology Readiness Status

TRL 4 - Lab Validation

Intellectual Property

US Patent 8,267,914 B1 (Method and Apparatus for AC Electrospray)

Publication

A New AC Electrospray Mechanism by Maxwell-Wagner Polarization and Capillary Resonance 
doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.133902


Contact

Richard Cox

rcox4@nd.edu

574.631.5158